Monday’s Link Roundup.

Monday's Link Roundup

In today’s Monday’s Link Roundup, a must-read is Amnesia and the Self That Remains When Memory Is Lost. It’s a poignant recounting of the power of the self despite the ravages of a brain tumor. For book lovers, I can’t think of a better vacation than visiting The 20 Most Beautiful Bookstores in the World.  Care to join me? ;-) And for photographers, don’t miss 25 Amazing Things That Happened in Photo This Year.

  • The Darkling Thrush. “Hope is not an easy word to use well, in poetry or out of it. Evoking hope too easily can feel kind of glib or damp; saying there is none, though the opposite, can feel sentimental in a similar way. The right shade of belief and doubt can seem impossible to express. In his great poem for a new year, “The Darkling Thrush,” Thomas Hardy gets that kind of meaning right, I think. Hardy says he “could think” of a “blessed hope” of which he is “unaware.”
  • The 20 Most Beautiful Bookstores in the World. “With Amazon slowly taking over the publishing world and bookstores closing left and right, things can sometimes seem a little grim for the brick and mortar booksellers of the world. After all, why would anyone leave the comfort of their couch to buy a book when with just a click of a button, they could have it delivered to their door? Well, here’s why: bookstores so beautiful they’re worth getting out of the house (or the country) to visit whether you need a new hardcover or not.”
  • Amnesia and the Self That Remains When Memory Is Lost. “Tom was one of those people we all have in our lives — someone to go out to lunch with in a large group, but not someone I ever spent time with one-on-one. We had some classes together in college and even worked in the same cognitive psychology lab for a while. But I didn’t really know him. Even so, when I heard that he had brain cancer that would kill him in four months, it stopped me cold.”
  • Ted Hughes on the Universal Inner Child, in a Moving Letter to His Son. “The analogy between the artist and the child is that both live in a world of their own making,” wrote Anaïs Nin in her diary in 1945. Four decades later, 23 years after Sylvia Plath took her own life at the age of 30, Ted Hughes (1930-1998) wrote to their 24-year-old son, Nicholas. The letter, found in Letters of Ted Hughes (public library), is superb in its entirety and a worthy addition to history’s finest fatherly advice,..”
  • The Best Google Features You’re Probably Not Using. “Google is a vast machine with all types of apps, programs, and tools. A lot of these—like Gmail and Google Docs—are clearly useful and beloved by many. But hidden inside Google’s network are some awesome, lesser-known gems that can make your life easier.”

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