Tag Archives: Gays

Monday’s Link Roundup.

To start off your week, why not peruse some of these lively articles in Monday’s Links Roundup? I recommend The Power of Color! for tips on how to use color to sell your products or services.  And for a really creative memoir idea, take a look at The Sidewalk Memoir Project.

  • From Scroll to Screen. “Something very important and very weird is happening to the book right now: It’s shedding its papery corpus and transmigrating into a bodiless digital form, right before our eyes. We’re witnessing the bibliographical equivalent of the rapture. If anything we may be lowballing the weirdness of it all. The last time a change of this magnitude occurred was circa 1450, when Johannes Gutenberg invented movable type.”
  • Five Ways to Improve Your Social Media Skills. “The sites you subscribe to and the thoughts you post define you: as a connection, a customer and even a thought leader. If you have a product or service and you are not using social media to reach out to the masses you are missing a huge opportunity.”
  • The Sidewalk Memoir Project. “I’m teaching an 8 a.m. session of Writing Rhetorically this semester, which is Bridgewater State’s equivalent on Writing I. You need to be a little innovative when you’re trying to hold a class’s attention that early in the morning, so here’s what we ended up doing Thursday. The exercise — which doubled as a lesson in brevity as well as audience — ended up going much better than I thought it was.”
  • National Punctuation Day. “This Saturday, September 24, is National Punctuation Day. Founded by Jeff Rubin, the holiday seems readymade for copyeditors. Rubin’s site offers a few ways to celebrate his holiday, but for word professionals, the best way is to correct punctuation in your editing every day—not just on Punctuation Day—and instruct your writers on better punctuation usage. Gently, of course. Here are a few resources for punctuation lessons:”

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Monday’s Link Roundup.

This Monday’s Link Roundup is a marvelous mix.  Make sure to check out the teleclass, workflow: key to a profitable personal history business by cj Madigan. For those of you looking for another personal history product to offer, take a look at Storyteller illustrates the arc of people’s lives who are no longer able to speak. There are some great business tips to be found in What a flight attendant taught me about business. Enjoy!

  • workflow: key to a profitable personal history business. A teleclass. April 28, 2010. “How, exactly, do you get from a completed manuscript in Word to a printed and bound book? There’s more to it than just “giving your Word file to the printer”. This teleclass addresses that question for writers, editors, graphic designers, personal historians and others involved in producing privately published books, whether they do the work themselves or subcontract the various services involved.”
  • Storyteller illustrates the arc of people’s lives who are no longer able to speak. “Blanchard, 57, creates what she calls “I Am Stories” for the elderly who have lost their ability to speak and express themselves … About four years ago, Blanchard wrote out a simple, one-page story about her mother, Lois Eades, who lives at St. Peter Villa, and taped it to the wall in her mom’s room. She hoped that people coming in to care for her mother would read it and learn something they hadn’t known before…Blanchard eventually typed up her mother’s story, framed and matted it, along with a photograph, and hung it in her mother’s room. Now she offers the same service to others for $150.”
  • When Was the Last Time You Told Your Story? “As I write in the epigraph to The Voice of the Muse: Answering the Call to Write, writing is “truly a tool of wizards, witches and sorcerers.” It’s through the alchemy of our stories, lived authentically and shared truthfully, that all worlds change, beginning with our own.”
  • What a flight attendant taught me about business. “Over the past few years I have been traveling on airplanes a lot. So much that I started to pay attention to the flight attendants because although they are taken for granted, they are actually pretty smart. Here is what you can learn about business from them:”
  • The Rainbow Tree Genealogy Becoming Important for Gays. “Should there ever be some gay, lesbian or transgender descendant from one of my many cousins in the future, I want them to look at our family tree and see that they are not alone. I want them to take pride in our shared history and feel that they are loved, included and valid. Gays and Lesbians have been systematically deleted from history for far too long and it’s time we started owning our rightful place in the records of our families.”
  • Play gives survivors a chance to say ‘Hear Us!’ “Every playwright strives for verisimilitude, but that’s something Toby Armour didn’t have to worry about with “Hear Us!” The plain truths, the biting reactions and the raw emotions the East Haven writer captures are the verbatim words from survivors who have suffered the loss of a relative or friend through murder — people from in and around the Greater New Haven area whose stories we may have seen in headlines.”
  • Blogging Fears and How to Overcome Them for Good – Part 1. “I asked you guys to spill your guts about what your blogging fears were, and you totally came through. Not everyone would be willing to say what they’re afraid of about blogging. But enough of you were brave enough to give me eleven different blogging fears, which gives me a lot of great material to work with to create a super-helpful post for you.”

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