Tag Archives: genealogy

Monday’s Link Roundup.

It’s the beginning of another week and that means  some fascinating new stories in  Monday’s Link Roundup to get you started. My favorite is Dear Photograph. The picture that accompanies this article is particularly poignant.  And don’t miss Vladimir Nabokov and the Art of the Self-Interview. It illuminates a little known side of the Russian – American writer.

  • Whither Digital Video Preservation? “Finding appropriate digital preservation file formats for audiovisual materials is not an easy task.  While much of the recorded sound preservation realm has agreed upon the viability of the Broadcast Wave file format for sound materials, the video realm is still kind of the Wild West in that there is no broad consensus regarding what kinds of file formats or codecs are appropriate for preservation.”
  • Who’s on the Family Tree? Now It’s Complicated. “Genealogists have long defined familial relations along bloodlines or marriage. But as the composition of families changes, so too has the notion of who gets a branch on the family tree. Some families now organize their family tree into two separate histories: genetic and emotional. Some schools, where charting family history has traditionally been a classroom project, are now skipping the exercise altogether.”
  • DailyLit. “DailyLit sends you bite-sized chunks of public domain books (including many classics) daily, on weekdays, or three times a week via email or RSS — for free. Each serving takes less than five minutes to read, and if you want, they’ll send you the next installment right away if you click a link.”
  • Dear Photograph: A website with a window into the past. “In the past month, a summery, slightly sad website has made the trip from non-existence to international exposure. It’s called Dear Photograph, and its premise is simple: Take a picture of an old photo being carefully held up in front of the place it was originally taken, so it appears to be a window into the past.”
  • Vladimir Nabokov and the Art of the Self-Interview. “Nabokov—to my knowledge—never conducted an interview without having received and answered the questions in advance. Even when he appeared with Lionel Trilling on a “live” taped interview on a 1958 program called “Close Up” to discuss the controversy surrounding Lolita for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, Nabokov reads his responses—on television—from his index cards.”
  • Immigrants to Canada Online. “Library and Archives Canada (LAC) holds the Canadian immigration records for the years 1865 to 1935. The lists are online, providing 23,482 references to immigration records held at Library and Archives Canada. Those passenger lists are the sole surviving official records of the arrival of the majority of people accepted as immigrants in Canada.”

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Monday’s Link Roundup.

My favorite article in this week’s Monday’s Link Roundup is Belongings.  You won’t want to miss it! For an item that’s  quite wonderful in a strange sort of way take a look at The Happy Cemetery. And something we can all work on is covered in  Can You Say It In One Short Sentence?

  • Belongings. “There are three million immigrants in New York City. When they left home, knowing it could be forever, they packed what they could not bear to leave behind: necessities, luxuries, memories. Here is a look at what some of them brought.” [Thanks to Lettice Stuart of Portrait in Words for alerting me to this item.]
  • From research to story. “A bevy of biographers gathered in May in Washington, D.C., at the second annual Compleat Biographer Conference to discuss how to chase down subjects and make their lives into great stories…Today, we have highlights from the panel on “Turning Research into Narrative.” Speakers included Anne Heller, John Aloysius Farrell, Jane Leavy and moderator Amy Schapiro.”
  • The Happy Cemetery. “Originally begun by a peasant grave carver named Stan Petras in the 1930s, and carried on today by the Pop family, the cemetery has become one of the most popular tourism attractions in rural Romania, with tour buses pulling up and unloading foreigners hourly.”

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Monday’s Link Roundup.

In this Monday’s Link Roundup be sure to take a look at the charming Dear Sophie. It’s a little over a minute long and points to the increasingly creative ways we can tell  our stories.  With the 70th anniversary of the premiere of Citizen Kane you’ll want to read Jane Shafron’s perceptive article, Video Biographers: 5 Quick Tips from Citizen Kane.

  • Top 10 Genealogy Mistakes to Avoid. “If you are new to genealogy research…there are ten key mistakes that you will want to avoid in order to make your search a successful and pleasant experience.”
  • Dear Sophie. “A father uses the web to share memories with his daughter as she grows up in this video depiction.”
  • 100 Digital Storytelling Tools: Part 1. “Here are the first 25 digital storytelling tools that you can use … to tell your digital story. I’m sure you are already familiar with some of them and I hope you can find new tools to use.”
  • Video Biographers:5 Quick Tips from Citizen Kane. “For video biographers, personal documentary makers, and all of us interested in preserving personal and family history, Citizen Kane is still surprisingly rich in lessons and inspiration, and well worth the rental of the video DVD. So, what are some of the lessons from Citizen Kane that we can apply to our work?”
  • Grief Observed: Using Movies to Move through Grief. “Movies and DVD rentals that dramatize others coming to terms with their pain may serve as a valuable tool to help you and your family members move through the grieving process…Movies can be an effective tool in addressing certain grief issues, especially when your selections are made consciously and deliberately.”
  • The Case for Cursive. “The sinuous letters of the cursive alphabet, swirled on countless love letters, credit card slips and banners above elementary school chalk boards are going the way of the quill and inkwell. With computer keyboards and smartphones increasingly occupying young fingers, the gradual death of the fancier ABC’s is revealing some unforeseen challenges.”
  • ‘Secret’ Love Stories Revealed. “Choreography that includes oral components, historical research and overt storytelling is increasingly fashionable in modern dance. Sean Dorsey, the first transgender artist to be named Dance Magazine’s “25 to Watch” and winner of two Isadora Duncan Dance Awards, is using this approach in an ambitious attempt to express the love stories of transgender and queer people from the 1920s to the present.”

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Monday’s Link Roundup.

For my grammarian friends, this Monday’s Link Roundup has an article you’ll love: Colonoscopy: It’s Time to Check Your Colons. Also, I was particularly moved by Hanishar, or What Remains, photographer Yuri Dojic’s poignant exhibition of Jewish books that survived the holocaust.

  • A Digital Archive of Vintage Television Commercials. “AdViews is a digital archive of thousands of vintage television commercials dating from the 1950s to the 1980s. These commercials were created or collected by the ad agency Benton & Bowles or its successor, D’Arcy Masius Benton & Bowles (DMB&B).”
  • Through the Middle: Barber vs. Impermanence. “Last year, we featured 7 short films about near-obsolete occupations, which went on to become one of our most enjoyed pickings all year. Today, we add to that collection Through the Middle — a beautiful observational documentary about an aging barber named Mr. S and the slow decline of his business. The film follows his profound reflections as he confronts his retirement, the loss of his patrons, and the ever-changing face of the city.”
  • 109 Ways to Make Your Business Irresistible to the Media. “Getting a mainstream media outlet to pay attention to your business seems like an impossible-to-solve mystery…After 10 years as a journalist, I’ve seen just about every bad pitch you can imagine. And I’ve also come up with 109 foolproof ways to entice the media in your city to highlight your business — approaches that make the mainstream media unable to resist you.”
  • Hanishar, or What Remains. “For the past fourteen years, the photographer Yuri Dojc, who was born in what is now Slovakia, has been scouring his homeland for Jewish books that survived the Holocaust. When he recently showed one of the photographs to the Israeli scholar Moshe Halbertal, though, Halbertal assumed it had been digitally altered. In this particular photo, just one Hebrew word, Hanishar, was legible, written on a page in a prayer book. Dojc doesn’t speak Hebrew, and so it was up to Halbertal to translate. Hanishar, he told Dojc, means “what remains.” [To see the video What Remains click here.]
  • The Art of Handling Criticism Gracefully. “If you’re going to do anything interesting in the world, criticism is an unavoidable fact…The trick to navigating the icebergs of criticism is to figure out which are helpful, and steer clear of those that aren’t.”
  • WhatWasThere: See How Cities and Towns Looked In The Past. “One web site should interest any genealogist or historian. WhatWasThere.com has a simple purpose: provide a platform where anyone can easily upload a photograph with two straightforward tags to provide context: Location and Year. If enough people upload enough photographs in enough places, together we will weave together a photographic history of the world.”

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Monday’s Link Roundup.

In this Monday’s Link Roundup there’s much to feast on.  Don’t  miss Colour footage of London, 1920s. It’s from a site called “How to be a Retronaught: time-travel without a time-machine.” You’ll want to spend time there. It’s brilliant!

  • 10 Tips for Effective Book Covers. “As more authors opt for independent publishing routes, I’m getting more questions about secrets to good book design, production, and layout … Here are the 10 biggest things I learned about book cover design during those conversations (and also from seeing the sales outcomes).”
  • 50 Most Popular Genealogy Websites for 2011. “These rankings were determined in January 2011. They are based on the popularity of websites as measured by four major ranking companies, and is explained in an article published in the July/August 2008 issue of the Digital Genealogist.”
  • Virtual Museum of Canada. “As an endless source of discoveries, virtualmuseum.ca is a unique interactive space that brings together Canadian museum collections and riches in a variety of thought-provoking and instructive contents. It’s your window on current museum news and your reference guide to plan your next outing. Enter your Canadian museum space.”
  • Colour footage of London, 1920s. “This film was made in 1927 by Claude Friese-Greene. It shows scenes of London Bridge, the Thames, the Tower of London, Greenwich Observatory, the London docks, Whitehall, the Cenotaph, Trafalgar Square, Hyde Park, Marble Arch, Petticoat Lane, the Oval, the Changing of the Guard, Rotten Row, and the Houses of Parliament.”
  • Four Fundamentals to Understanding eBooks. “As you make the decision whether or not to convert your manuscript or book into an eBook, there are some important things to keep in mind. eBooks aren’t like regular print books, a fact that offers both advantages and disadvantages. The following outline is an overview of the basics of eBook conversions, from the publisher’s point of view, highlighting key information to help shed light on this complicated process.” [Thanks to Lettice Stuart of Portraits in Words for alerting me to this item.]
  • 3 Important Privacy Issues in Memoir. “When we write memoir, we pull back the curtain on our private lives and invite readers in. We willingly give up our privacy, or a chunk of it. But because we’re human, our stories also include other people: parents and siblings, teachers and neighbors, lovers and friends—and they haven’t exactly signed on to the deal. What about their privacy?”

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Monday’s Link Roundup.

On this Monday’s Link Roundup we have some terrific historical photography. Don’t miss Russia in color, a century ago. It’s riveting stuff. And on another photographic theme, I highly recommend Old family photos bring Polish history exhibit to life.

  • Old family photos bring Polish history exhibit to life. “…Eszter Andor and Dora Sardi, started Centropa, a Jewish historical institute that spent eight years training young historians in 15 European countries to create a different sort of oral history project.  Rather than interview Central Europe’s last living Holocaust survivors on video, Centropa has digitized more than 20,000 of their family photos (while also interviewing them).”
  • Russia in color, a century ago. “…photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863-1944) undertook a photographic survey of the Russian Empire with the support of Tsar Nicholas II. He used a specialized camera to capture three black and white images in fairly quick succession, using red, green and blue filters, allowing them to later be recombined and projected with filtered lanterns to show near true color images. The high quality of the images, combined with the bright colors, make it difficult for viewers to believe that they are looking 100 years back in time – when these photographs were taken, neither the Russian Revolution nor World War I had yet begun.”
  • 7 Ways Mobile Apps are Enriching Historical Tourism. “Some of the most famous historical sites would be just another old house or pile of rubble if you didn’t have any background information about their significance…Now, many programmers are also offering tourists the option to learn about these sites via their smartphones.”
  • Printing Heirloom Photo Negatives. “My grandfather gave me boxes of family research materials with hundreds of early (pre-35mm) black and white photo negatives. Many were taken at family reunions. I’d like to have prints made of some or all of the negatives, but I’ve been unable to find a company that can process them. Do you know where I might have my negatives made into prints?”
  • How To Give A Great Speech. “Forget fancy PowerPoint presentations and loads of data. Instead, keep your speech simple, with a clear beginning, middle and end. Focus on one theme, and eliminate everything else.”
  • VoiceTales. “… created with the idea that there is nothing more personal than your voice.  And knowing that we all have tales to tell, those two words together sparked an idea that we hope will support and encourage kids of all ages to enjoy VoiceTales recordings for generations to come.”

Monday’s Link Roundup.

In this Monday’s Link Roundup be sure to check out find stillness to cure the illness.  It’s about taking time to stop and be mindful. Altogether now… breathing in slowly… and breathing out slowly… Don’t you feel better already? ;)

Top 5 Most Unique Family Trees. “While I love any well-designed Family Tree, I especially adore the more modern versions that add a little uniqueness to the time-tested keepsake. So whether you’re looking for a way to visually express your family ties or for a special gift (like for a new baby, perhaps!), here are some beautiful and unique Family Trees.”

Highlights from the World of Visual Storytelling, Part 1. “…if visual storytelling in graphic novels is growing, it is also growing in numerous other manifestations and venues. Here’s a partial sampling from the last several months; look for Part 2 of this post on Oct. 10.”

Graphics Atlas. “…a new online resource that brings sophisticated print identification and characteristic exploration tools to archivists, curators, historians, collectors, conservators, educators, and the general public.”

Goodbye, cruel words: English. It’s dead to me.“The English language, which arose from humble Anglo-Saxon roots to become the lingua franca of 600 million people worldwide and the dominant lexicon of international discourse, is dead. It succumbed last month at the age of 1,617 after a long illness. It is survived by an ignominiously diminished form of itself.” [Thanks to Paula Stahel of  Breath and Shadows Productions for alerting me to this item.]

Ancestorville. “… a genealogy web site with more than 4,000 lost family photographs, antique paper, and identified genealogy antiques for sale. The site has identified more than 10,000 surnames amongst the items available for sale.”

Important Slavery Collection Goes Online. “The New-York Historical Society  has announced the launch of a new online portal to nearly 12,000 pages of source materials documenting the history of slavery in the United States, the Atlantic slave trade and the abolitionist movement. Made readily accessible to the general public for the first time at www.nyhistory.org/slaverycollections,  these documents from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries represent fourteen of the most important collections in the library’s Manuscript Department.”

find stillness to cure the illness. “It’s a busy day, and you’re inundated by non-stop emails, text messages, phone calls, instant message requests, notifications, interruptions of all kinds.”

Monday’s Link Roundup.

Happy Labor Day! I’m back from my “staycation” (somewhat) rested and ready to bring you more wonderful links. This Monday I highly recommend My father still laughed in the face of death. And for those of you interested in graphic design be sure to watch the trailer for Typeface.

Smalltopia: A Practical Guide to Working for Yourself. “…full of tips, tools, and strategies to help you create personal freedom through a very small business. Smalltopia is broken up into three sections: Philosophy, Business Essentials, and Case Studies. The ebook tells my personal story of escaping the rat race and the lessons I learned along the way.”

The Power of Storytelling: Creating a New Future for American Muslims. “In seventh-century Arabia, the storyteller was valued more than the swordsman. The audience sat on the floor surrounding the gifted orator as he captivated the eager listeners with beautiful poetry narrating their history. In the twenty-first century, the art form may have evolved to include motion pictures, TV shows, theater productions, novels, and stand-up comedy, but they all serve the same function: storytelling.”[Thanks to APH member Marcy Davis for alerting me to this item.]

My father still laughed in the face of death. “At the hospice he and his favourite palliative-care nurse would fall into fits of contagious laughter. It was his drug of choice.”

Home Life: A Journey Through Rooms and Recollections. “This is a memoir, but don’t be put off. Fox has organized her memories around a witty and beguiling conceit: rooms, homes, and spaces she has stayed in or, in the case of the Bordeaux room at the Metropolitan Museum, been enchanted by.” ~ from Booklist [Thanks to cj madigan of Shoebox Stories for alerting me to this item.]

Make the Most of Your Memory: 10 Tips for Writing About Your LIfe. “Because memoirs are categorized as nonfiction, you intend to “tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth,” right? But how can you be sure your words are true (and avoid controversy)? How can you tell the whole truth of your richly detailed life, when you can’t even remember what you had for breakfast yesterday? And if you aim to tell “nothing but the truth,” does that mean you can’t invent a little when certain facts escape you but are vital to the depth and/or coherence of the story?”

Typeface Official Trailer. “In a time when people can carry computers in their pockets and watch TV while walking down the street, Typeface dares to explore the twilight of an analog craft that is freshly inspiring artists in a digital age. The Hamilton Wood Type Museum in Two Rivers, WI personifies cultural preservation, rural re-birth and the lineage of American graphic design.” [Thanks to Marcy Davis for alerting me to this item.]

We Are All Cousins. “People are connected in surprising ways, says Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG, CGL, FASG, FNGS, FUGA — arguably the most influential genealogist of our time. Learn from the best with the NGS Online Video Series, produced by award-winning filmmakers Kate Geis and Allen Moore, featuring today’s most distinguished genealogy experts.”

Monday’s Link Roundup.

In this Monday’s Link Roundup, STORY in Photography is a fascinating look into the challenges of telling a story in a single photograph. And if you’re a nut about fonts, don’t miss Graphic Content | A Fount of Fonts.

  • 101 Best Genealogy Websites of 2010. “From state vital records and censuses to historical books and immigration data, this year’s 101 Best Websites list features tools that can bust your brick walls — but not your budget.”
  • STORY in Photography. “An understanding of the elements of story and how they can be incorporated into your images will make stronger images…Four aspects of storytelling come to mind as I consider the unique challenges of storytelling within the confines of a single photographic frame; themes that tie the image to our deeper, more universal human experience; conflict; mystery; and the relationships between the characters.”
  • Graphic Content | A Fount of Fonts.Tipoteca Italiana is a private foundation that was founded in 1995 to advance printing knowledge and preserve venerable printing technologies. Its founder, Silvio Antiga, a 65-year-old printer who owns a printing firm in the Veneto region, has collected more than 20 vintage presses and typesetting machines, along with hundreds of wood and metal type “fonts.” The smartly designed, modern museum includes a working print shop, which employs master craftsmen who hand-set type and pull proofs. It is open to the public — more than 8,000 people visit each year — and has become a mecca for designers and students from all over the world.” [Thanks to APH member Marcy Davis for alerting me to this item.]
  • U.S. public libraries: We lose them at our peril. “The U.S. is beginning an interesting experiment in democracy: We’re cutting public library funds, shrinking our public and school libraries, and in some places, shutting them altogether…The school libraries and public libraries in which we’ve invested decades and even centuries of resources will disappear unless we fight for them. Those in cities that haven’t preserved their libraries, those less fortunate and baffled by technology, and our children will be the first to suffer. But sooner or later, we’ll all feel the loss as one of the most effective levelers of privilege and avenues of reinvention — one of the great engines of democracy — begins to disappear.” [Thanks to cj madigan of Shoebox Stories for alerting me to this item.]
  • Step-by-Step Guide to Oral History. “Your stories and the stories of the people around you are unique, valuable treasures for your family and your community. You and your family members can preserve unwritten family history using oral history techniques…As a door into the world of oral history, these pages give basic suggestions for collecting and preserving the valuable oral treasures around you, to enrich you and future generations.”

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Monday’s Link Roundup.

Another Monday and a roundup of some of my  favorite links.  If you love design as much as I do, don’t miss An industry in re-covery. It looks at how good design may yet save the printed book from the onslaught of e-books. Still uncertain what you should be charging for your work? For some helpful tips, take a look at How Should Freelance Writers Determine What Price to Charge?

  • Listening to History. “Developed organically in a series of improvisatory workshops, based on real people in a real place over a 90-year period, and conceived without a conventional script, The Tosca Project presented a particularly complex challenge. What kind of information would be most helpful to the process? Where could we find it? How could we make it accessible to the cast and creators?”
  • How Should Freelance Writers Determine What Price to Charge? “If you’re a freelance writer (or if you hire freelance writers), then you may have a difficult time determining what the market price for writing is. Of course, your lowballing client would have you believe that nearly all writers work for practically nothing at all–but, don’t you believe them.”
  • An industry in re-covery. “To give new life to old titles, publishers are turning to what e-books can’t offer yet: great design.”
  • And Now, the Tricky Part: Naming Your Business. “As many entrepreneurs can attest, deciding on a name for a new business is no easy task. One with pizzazz can set a new company apart; one that misses the mark can make a burgeoning start-up fall flat.The problem, marketing and branding experts agree, is that there is no magic bullet to picking the best name.” [Thanks to Diane Dassow of Binding Legacies for alerting me to this item.]
  • Exploring My America. “We’re asking engaging, adventurous people to hit the road for a week and tell their story and the stories of the people they meet. Does that sound like you? The program will run from July 11 through August 28, 2010. Over the course of the program, we’ll launch three road trip teams on different routes each week. Each team’s mission is to interact with people along their assigned route, capture interesting stories of unique personalities and places throughout their journey, and upload their stories to the program website.”

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