Tag Archives: grammar rules

Monday’s Link Roundup.

In this Monday’s Link’s Roundup, if you’re a grammarian, you’ll want to check out The Rise of “Logical Punctuation”.  For those of you wanting a bit of inspiration to start your week, take a look at 7 Brilliant Book Trailers.

  • The Rise of “Logical Punctuation”. “For at least two centuries, it has been standard practice in the United States to place commas and periods inside of quotation marks. This rule still holds for professionally edited prose: what you’ll find in Slate, the New York Times, the Washington Post—almost any place adhering to Modern Language Association (MLA) or AP guidelines. But in copy-editor-free zones—the Web and emails, student papers, business memos—with increasing frequency, commas and periods find themselves on the outside of quotation marks, looking in. A punctuation paradigm is shifting.”
  • How To Repair Scratched and Damaged Photographs or Scans. “Old photographs seem to collect dirt, scratches, and bad textures as they collect dust in shoeboxes and photo albums. If you’ve taken the task of scanning them, but have found damage and scratches, here’s how to fix them.”
  • The Writers’ Houses Project: Architecture Meets Words. “I have an ongoing fascination with where creators create. And while it’s somewhat easier to picture the studios of artists and designers, since there’s an aesthetic expectation aligned with their visual styles, it’s invariably a mystery to imagine where wordsmiths work their magic. That’s the subject of a collaboration between literary pilgrim A.N. Devers and design duo Michael Fusco and Emma Straub, based on the excellent Writers’ Houses site, exploring the domiciles of famous scribes through a series of stunning screenprints.”
  • Digital Images of Yale’s Vast Cultural Collections Now Available for Free. “Scholars, artists and other individuals around the world will enjoy free access to online images of millions of objects housed in Yale’s museums, archives, and libraries thanks to a new “Open Access” policy that the University announced today. Yale is the first Ivy League university to make its collections accessible in this fashion, and already more than 250,000 images are available through a newly developed collective catalog.”
  • 7 Brilliant Book Trailers. “With a killer combination of animation, motion graphics and music, what’s not to love about book trailers? We couldn’t think of a thing, which is why we’ve rounded up seven of our favorites. As provocative, funny, and poignant as the books they represent, these videos prove that ideas are the ultimate teasers.”

If you enjoyed this post, get free updates by email.

Monday’s Link Roundup.

**LAST WEEK to vote on my poll: How long have you been a personal historian? Click here to vote.**

Happy Memorial Day to all my American readers! This Monday’s Link Roundup has something for grammarians. Afraid of splitting your infinitives? Well, no need to worry! Check out Five Grammar “Rules” That Beg To Be Broken. If you find proofing your own work still leaves you missing pesky typos, then you’ll want to read Proofreading Tips for Finding Errors in Your Own Writing.

  • Five Grammar “Rules” That Beg To Be Broken. “For those of us who were actually taught grammar in school, we have stored in our long-term memory a list of unbreakable grammar rules…And guess what: some of the nevers never were grammar rules. They are grammar myths passed down from English teacher to English teacher to your boss.”
  • Preserving Family Memories (Podcast). “Stories. Conversations. Oral History Interviews. Whatever you call them, they can help us discover our family heritage and provide us with precious information that can be passed on for generations to come. We are preserving our family memories with Diane Haddad, the editor of Family Tree Magazine.”
  • ReclaimPrivacy Bookmarklet Rates Your Facebook Exposure Levels. “Facebook’s privacy settings are notoriously complex, and the results of changes hard to see instantly. ReclaimPrivacy.org has a handy bookmarklet that shows which potentially insecure and privacy-invading settings are enabled on your Facebook account when you click it.”
  • Proofreading Tips for Finding Errors in Your Own Writing. “Reading the newspaper each day, I catch frequent errors in grammar and usage. It’s easy for me to find errors in newspapers—and, in general, in the writing of others. What’s hard is finding errors in my own writing.”
  • The No. 1 Habit of Highly Creative People. “Creativity is a nebulous, murky topic that fascinates me endlessly — how does it work? What habits to creative people do that makes them so successful at creativity?”

If you enjoyed this post, get free updates by email.

Poll: How long have you been a personal historian? Click here.

Share this post.

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to Ma.gnoliaAdd to TechnoratiAdd to FurlAdd to Newsvine