Tag Archives: Photos

Monday’s Link Roundup.

To get your week started, this Monday’s Link Roundup has a little something for everyone. For the technology inclined, check out Edit Photos In the Cloud and The DV Show. For nostalgia buffs, don’t miss One Big Collection of 300 Vintage TV Ads.  It’s fabulous! If you love typography, you’ll love 10 Essential Books on Typography.  Do you like to tidy up loose ends? Then Wake-up Call: Write Your Obituary may be just what the doctor ordered. ;-)

  • Edit Photos In the Cloud. ” As more and more people and internet companies turn to The Cloud (a non-local storage location for data) for their daily computing activities, massive storage systems in personal computers are becoming less and less necessary. But the process of photo editing is still typically done the old fashioned way — by importing pictures onto your computer’s hard drive and editing them with a specialty (read: expensive) piece of photo editing software. But that’s all starting to change with the advent of cloud photo editing sites and apps. This guide will walk you through how to use our favorite web-based photo editor, Feather, by Aviary.”
  • Amazon Simple Email Service. “…a highly scalable and cost-effective bulk and transactional email-sending service for businesses and developers. Amazon SES eliminates the complexity and expense of building an in-house email solution or licensing, installing, and operating a third-party email service.”
  • Wake-Up Call: Write Your Obituary. “Although it sounds a bit macabre, writing your own obituary—or asking a friend or a family member to do it for you—can be an excellent wake-up call that can help you make important changes in your life. There’s more on this below.”
  • The DV Show: Podcasting the INs and Outs of Digital Video. “Hosted by Brian Alves, a 22-year veteran of video production, a crack team of 12 seasoned media professionals and one Entertainment Attorney, the shows feature answers to listener questions, careful reviews, product news, tips, tutorials, contests and high-profile interviews with industry professionals — all in a quick and engaging format for thousands of listeners to enjoy worldwide.” [Thanks to Pat McNees of Writers and Editors for alerting me to this item.]
  • A Crash Course in Marketing With Stories. “If you want your marketing to really sizzle, if you want people to remember it, you need to turn your marketing messages into stories. I’ve broken down the classical elements of story below so you can begin to think like a storyteller, and make your marketing messages stick.”
  • 10 Essential Books on Typography. “Whether you’re a professional designer, recreational type-nerd, or casual lover of the fine letterform, typography is one of design’s most delightful frontiers, an odd medley of timeless traditions and timely evolution in the face of technological progress. Today, we turn to 10 essential books on typography, ranging from the practical to the philosophical to the plain pretty.”
  • One Big Collection of 300 Vintage TV Ads. “Thanks to vintage advertising we can get at least some idea of what TV used to be like, which features used to be a big deal, what technology was exploding onto the scene, and what ad managers thought would sell the latest in entertainment.”

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Monday’s Link Roundup.

In this Monday’s Link Roundup don’t miss  Jonathan Harris: The Storytelling of Life. What a unique way to tell your life story! For something to get your week off to a smile be sure to check out Photos of Famous Writers (and Rockers) with their Dogs. Now  for us cat lovers all we need is Photos of Famous Writers with their Cats! Let me know if you come across such a collection.

  • The Long Goodbye. “Meghan O’Rourke’s memoir about the death of her mother, The Long Goodbye, is out this week [February 16,2009]. The book began as a series of essays for Slate, which we’ve republished below.”
  • How Genius Works. “Great art begins with an idea. Sometimes a vague or even bad one. How does that spark of creativity find its way to the canvas, the page, the dinner plate, or the movie screen? How is inspiration refined into the forms that delight or provoke us? We enlisted some of America’s foremost artists to discuss the sometimes messy, frequently maddening, and almost always mysterious process of creating something new.”
  • Tech Tips with Lisa Louise Cooke: WDYTYA Revisited & Photo Gems. “Photographs capture once-in-a-lifetime moments and treasured family memories that we certainly don’t want to forget. But assembling them in a way that can be enjoyed for years to come is not as simple as it was in the old days when we sat down to our scrapbooks and prints. Here are three tips for assembling your precious pics in a way that will delight you and those you share them with.”
  • Photos of Famous Writers (and Rockers) with their Dogs. “Courtesy of New York Social Diary, here is a lovely series of photographs featuring famous authors and their dogs. If you’ve ever wondered which breeds have served as muse to William Styron, Stephen King, William F. Buckley, Kurt Vonnegut, then this collection is for you.”
  • Jonathan Harris: The Storytelling of Life. “When he [Harris]turned 30, he decided to start taking one photo every day and posting it to his site before going to sleep — a seemingly simple, private project that soon turned into a fascinating exploration followed by thousands of people around the world. Our friends from m ss ng p eces — you remember them, right? — are back with another lovely documentary, capturing the project and the vivid, earnest curiosity with which Harris approaches the world.”

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Monday’s Link Roundup.

For my grammarian friends, this Monday’s Link Roundup has an article you’ll love: Colonoscopy: It’s Time to Check Your Colons. Also, I was particularly moved by Hanishar, or What Remains, photographer Yuri Dojic’s poignant exhibition of Jewish books that survived the holocaust.

  • A Digital Archive of Vintage Television Commercials. “AdViews is a digital archive of thousands of vintage television commercials dating from the 1950s to the 1980s. These commercials were created or collected by the ad agency Benton & Bowles or its successor, D’Arcy Masius Benton & Bowles (DMB&B).”
  • Through the Middle: Barber vs. Impermanence. “Last year, we featured 7 short films about near-obsolete occupations, which went on to become one of our most enjoyed pickings all year. Today, we add to that collection Through the Middle — a beautiful observational documentary about an aging barber named Mr. S and the slow decline of his business. The film follows his profound reflections as he confronts his retirement, the loss of his patrons, and the ever-changing face of the city.”
  • 109 Ways to Make Your Business Irresistible to the Media. “Getting a mainstream media outlet to pay attention to your business seems like an impossible-to-solve mystery…After 10 years as a journalist, I’ve seen just about every bad pitch you can imagine. And I’ve also come up with 109 foolproof ways to entice the media in your city to highlight your business — approaches that make the mainstream media unable to resist you.”
  • Hanishar, or What Remains. “For the past fourteen years, the photographer Yuri Dojc, who was born in what is now Slovakia, has been scouring his homeland for Jewish books that survived the Holocaust. When he recently showed one of the photographs to the Israeli scholar Moshe Halbertal, though, Halbertal assumed it had been digitally altered. In this particular photo, just one Hebrew word, Hanishar, was legible, written on a page in a prayer book. Dojc doesn’t speak Hebrew, and so it was up to Halbertal to translate. Hanishar, he told Dojc, means “what remains.” [To see the video What Remains click here.]
  • The Art of Handling Criticism Gracefully. “If you’re going to do anything interesting in the world, criticism is an unavoidable fact…The trick to navigating the icebergs of criticism is to figure out which are helpful, and steer clear of those that aren’t.”
  • WhatWasThere: See How Cities and Towns Looked In The Past. “One web site should interest any genealogist or historian. WhatWasThere.com has a simple purpose: provide a platform where anyone can easily upload a photograph with two straightforward tags to provide context: Location and Year. If enough people upload enough photographs in enough places, together we will weave together a photographic history of the world.”

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Monday’s Link Roundup.

In this Monday’s Link Roundup, if you’re a videographer, you’ll definitely want to read Three remarkable films shot on a Digital SLR. Is this the beginning of the end for video cameras?  And if you’re just looking for something entertaining, don’t miss Corpus Libris. It’s very cool.

  • 4 Top Book Formatting Mistakes to Avoid. “Looking at the actual files we print books from, like the Adobe InDesign files I produce, can be quite revealing … here’s a list of the most common formatting mistakes I’ve come across, and why you should avoid them.”
  • Three remarkable films shot on a Digital SLR. “… you might have overheard some buzz about the potential of digital SLR’s for shooting video. In particular I’m talking about the Canon 5D Mk II and the Canon 7D: both capable of shooting High Definition video as well as taking photographs.”
  • Comparisons of Genealogy Software. “Wikipedia has great, although abbreviated, comparisons of nearly all the current genealogy software. The list of software is impressive. I thought I knew about all the programs available today but must admit I have not previously heard of HuMo-gen.”
  • Corpus Libris.“…began as a fun little photo essay. As we kept going and going, I realized that many, many more people could enjoy and create similar photographs. The possibilities are practically endless! So, send me your Corpus Libris (body/book) photos …”
  • What Really Makes People Buy? “It’s the ultimate sales and marketing question, isn’t it? You work hard at marketing to make contact with potential clients for your professional services. Then you work even harder to get a chance to speak with them about what you have to offer. But how do you actually get them to hire you? The answer may not be what you think.”
  • EBook Conversion Services Directory. “The Ebook Conversion Services Directory is the place to find someone to convert your books into ebook formats. For books in Microsoft Word, Adobe InDesign, PDF or other formats, you’ll find people who can convert one book or many books at a time. Conversions are provided into ePub, Mobi, and many other formats for use in every eBook reader available today. When you need to get your products onto the shelves of the Kindle Store, Apple’s iBookstore, or BarnesandNoble.com, you’ll need one of these ebook conversion services.” [Thanks to Nancy Barnes of StoriesToTellBooks.com for alerting me to this item.]

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Monday’s Link Roundup.

This Monday’s Link Roundup has some items that are a  feast for the eyes. My favorite is Creative Cartography, a site showcasing a dazzling collection of unique maps, the likes of which you’ve never seen. We have lost Kodachrome but the images live on. Be sure to drop by A Tribute to KODACHROME: A Photography Icon. The images are luscious!

  • PBS Director’s Cut Interview with “Typeface” producer. “In a time when people can carry computers in their pockets and watch TV while walking down the street, “Typeface” dares to explore the twilight of the analog craft of wood type printing that is freshly inspiring artists in a digital age.”
  • Oral History Methods – U.C, Davis Extension Course. “Learn to conduct and record an oral history project at your own pace, in your own community, following the complete process of historical documentation. Create historical context, plan and organize interviews to meet your objectives, and decide on materials to use during interview sessions. Enroll now through Feb. 9 and complete by March 30. Fee: $325.00 ($345.00 if postmarked after 01/19/2011).”
  • Last Words by George Carlin. “For more than a decade before his 2008 death, groundbreaking stand-up comedian Carlin had been working on his autobiography with writer Hendra (Father Joe), who finished it by distilling hours of conversations with the irascible social commentator. Armed with an eye for detail and a seemingly photographic memory, Carlin retraces his life in full, chronicling petty crimes and stolen kisses, escalating drug problems and the death of his wife with unflinching honesty.”
  • The Gift. “Famed editor and author, Diana Athill, 93, reads her poem about her mother’s death, that was included in her best-selling memoir ‘Somewhere Towards the End’, published by Granta in the UK and Norton in the USA.”
  • Creative Cartography: 7 Must-Read Books on Maps. “We’re obsessed with maps — a fundamental sensemaking mechanism for the world, arguably the earliest form of standardized information design, and a relentless source of visual creativity. Today, we turn to seven fantastic books that explore the art and science of cartography from seven fascinating angles.”
  • Travel Film Archive. “Want to see what the world was like for your ancestors? Perhaps you wish to catch a glimpse of where they lived? Need videos for an archival documentary? You might even see a place you remember when you were younger if you look at a film on the Travel Film Archive.”
  • A Tribute to KODACHROME: A Photography Icon. “They say all good things in life come to an end …It was a difficult decision, given its rich history …We at Kodak want to celebrate with you the rich history of this storied film. Feel free to share with us your fondest memories of Kodachrome.”

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From the Archives: Act Now to Save and Store Your Old Photos.

Act Now to Save and Store Your Old Photos. If you’re like me, you’ve inherited old photo albums with the pictures held down on so called magnetic pages. The trouble with these albums  is that the adhesive used and the plastic liners damage the photos over time. Removing the photos is a priority. I went looking for help and boiled my research down to these seven essential steps. Step 1. Before attempting any photo removal make certain to scan digitally  each album page so that should a … Read More

My Top 10 Posts of 2010.

In the past twelve months these are the posts that have ranked as the most popular with  readers.  If you’ve missed some of these, now’s  your chance to catch up over the holidays. Enjoy!

  1. How Much Should You Pay A Personal Historian?
  2. Your Photo Restoration Resource List.
  3. 15 Great Memoirs Written by Women.
  4. 5 Print-On-Demand Sites You’ll Want to Consider.
  5. #1 Secret to Getting More Clients.
  6. 5 Top Sites for Free Online Videography Training.
  7. How to Interview Someone Who Is Terminally Ill: Part One.
  8. How to Salvage a Damaged Audio Cassette.
  9. Warning: Using Copyright Music Without Permission Is Illegal.
  10. How to Make Your Life Story Workshop Memorable.

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Monday’s Link Roundup.

Happy Monday! In this Monday’s Link Roundup you’ll discover there’s no shame in quitting, how to scan and restore photographs, why asking ” Why?” may not be a good thing,  the recorded voices of slavery, and much, much more.

  • How to Know When to Quit. “Quitting gets a bad rap. We’re often encouraged, from an early age, to stick with our projects at all costs – even when we’re totally fed up…Frankly, that’s nonsense.”
  • My Days. “25 elderly men and women between 79 and 104 years from Norway tell stories from their everyday lives. Filmmakers Hanne Jones and Eli Lea from the Norwegian film production company Flimmer Film went from door to door in old people’s homes in Bergen collecting stories from the residents lives. The stories were recorded, edited and vizualised with photographs from the storytellers personal photo albums. The films have been screened at Bergen Cinema and on the national public broadcaster channel NRK in Norway.”
  • Scanning and Restoring Photos. “I am a fan of Janine Smith, owner of Landailyn Research & Restoration, a Texas-based company whose services include family history research and photo restoration. Janine is a professional digital restorationist and is poised to increase her fan base by thousands having become one of the excellent instructors at Lynda.com.”
  • Interviewing Family: Why not Why? “Asking a question using the word “Why?” might sound judgemental. Especially if you’re family.When a family member asks another family member a question that begins with Why?, it might put the second person on the defensive in the same way as “Why didn’t you take out the trash?” You want to elicit information and stories, not put the person on the spot.”
  • Thirteen Overused and Abused Expressions I’d Like to Outlaw. “I recently came across an article about 115 forbidden words and expressions compiled by Randy Michaels, CEO of the Tribune Co.  The company owns the Chicago radio station WGN, and Michaels forbid radio anchors and reporters from using these words.”
  • Videos Preserve Memories, Messages of Terminally Ill. “One hospice in Florida that is making a difference by taping video documentaries to keep those family histories alive.Dawn Woodward is a director at the HPH Hospice Center in Spring Hill, Florida. There, she and a team of volunteers record legacy videos for patients like Anna Marie Dorcas.”
  • Voices from the Days of Slavery.“The almost seven hours of recorded interviews presented here took place between 1932 and 1975 in nine Southern states. Twenty-three interviewees, born between 1823 and the early 1860s, discuss how they felt about slavery, slaveholders, coercion of slaves, their families, and freedom. Several individuals sing songs, many of which were learned during the time of their enslavement.”

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Monday’s Link Roundup.

In this Monday’s Link Roundup Famous Last Words should provide an entertaining distraction.  Here’s a sample of what you’ll find.

“Yes, it’s tough, but not as tough as doing comedy.” Actor Edmund Gwenn, upon being asked if he thought dying was tough.

On a more serious note take a look at Why Indiscretions Appear Youthful. This is interesting reading for personal historians.

  • 100 Places to Find Your Next Great Read. “Whether you’re into classics, mysteries, or a fluffy romance novel, it can sometimes be a challenge to find new books to fall in love with. However, the Internet is full of great sites that can help you get connected with books that you’ll really enjoy reading. Check out these communities, review sites, and other outposts of quality books to discover great stories.”
  • Roll Your Own E-Books. “Want to ditch the heavy backpack full of books and join the digital book revolution? Here’s out guide to creating a digital copy of just about any book — whether it’s your own masterpiece or an old paper copy of Cervantes — into a digital book.”
  • Library archivist explains how to research the history of an old house. “Anyone who lives in an older house knows it has a story to tell about its past, if only they could unearth it. When you live in an old house, “You form a bond,” Debra Charpentier, archivist at the Millicent Library, told an audience of close to 50 people at the library on Saturday.”
  • Online Storytelling Part 1 – EdmontonStories. “The City of Edmonton created the online storytelling repository EdmontonStories after corporate branding research revealed a big “perception gap” between local residents and other Canadians. Edmontonians generally love their city, with its endless sunshine, ample parkland and lively festivals. Outside of Edmonton, however, the city is often stereotyped as a shopping mecca and tax haven with miserable weather, little historical interest and poor liveability… One certain measure of EdmontonStories’ success is the sheer diversity of content now offered on the site. Stories are available in 17 languages, with both text and video content.”
  • Famous Last Words. “Last Words are interesting, illuminating and entertaining.  The Famous Last Words widget quotes some of the best epitaphs, last words, and final quotes from celebrities, celebrity gravestones, and old funny tombstones. We’ve provided them here in widget and feed format so that you can add them to your website, blog, or personal homepage in order to receive a different one every day to reflect upon.”
  • Why Indiscretions Appear Youthful. “We can’t make up the past, but the brain has difficulty placing events in time, and we’re able to shift elements around,” said Anne E. Wilson, a social psychologist at Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Ontario. “The result is that we can create a personal history that, if not perfect, makes us feel we’re getting better and better.” [Thanks to Hella Buchheim of lifestorytriggers.com for alerting me to this item.]

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From The Archives: Don’t Pass Up This Keepsake.

Don't Pass Up This Keepsake. Keepsake by Marilyn Koop is a must-have for your library.  A friend  gave me a copy the other day and I’ve been totally captivated by it. Each page contains a photograph of time-worn hands cradling a loved keepsake. On the page opposite is a cameo history of the person, a brief story behind the keepsake, and words of advice. There are twenty portraits in the collection. All save two were of people living at the Wellington Terrace, an assisted car … Read More