Tag Archives: Tibet Oral History

Monday’s Link Roundup.

Happy Monday! Get your week off to a good start by taking time to peruse this edition of  Monday’s Link Roundup. For a blast of nostalgia don’t miss “Big Chill” Promo. If you’re looking for something more serious, take a moment to read When Google Runs Out of Data to Exploit, What’s Next? It’s  scary stuff particularly if you believe in the free flow of shared knowledge on the Internet.

  • Independent Publishing: That’s Evolution! “Will the independent publishing field ever settle into a stable, recognizable shape? Or, will this world continue to shake itself into a torpor where everyone gives up and returns to the quill pen?”
  • Copywriting 101: Your Guide to Effective Copy. “Copywriting is one of the most essential elements of effective online marketing. The art and science of direct-response copywriting involves strategically delivering words (whether written or spoken) that get people to take some form of action.”
  • John Bengtson, archeologist of early cinema. “…it all started some years back when he noticed some familiar looking buildings in the background of an old Buster Keaton film…Armed with photographs of scenes taken off his television set (this was in the earliest days of the internet, and when laser discs still ruled), Bengtson stepped outside in the hopes of locating where Keaton filmed a chase sequence in Daydreams (1922); it turned out to be not far from where the film buff lived. Soon, Bengtson established every other San Francisco location from Daydreams.”
  • Experts worry that the family photo album is being lost to technology. “It’s a problem that has historians and archivists worried that the late 20th and early 21st century — arguably the most photographed period in history — could be the least permanently documented since George Eastman first introduced his “box camera” to the world.”
  • When Google Runs Out of Data to Exploit, What’s Next? “After digitizing all print and images, the Googles of the world may go after “oral property” — collective traditional knowledge that may not be written, but has commercial potential…On the BBC early in August, Andrew Wylie urged publishers to take a tougher stance towards “digital device holders” like Amazon and Apple, and warned: “I think if they allow the digital distributors to set the music then the dance will become fatal.”
  • Scan and Digitize Your Books for $1 Each. “I write about a lot of services and products in this newsletter, but this is one I think I will use frequently! Anyone can use 1DollarScan by filling out an online order form and then shipping the books or other materials to 1DollarScan’s offices in San Jose, California. The company scans them and converts them into PDF files and also performs OCR (optical character recognition) to create a text layer behind the images to make the text searchable and selectable. The PDF files and text files can be sent to the customer by download or on DVD disks.”
  • “Big Chill”Promo.“This is the film trailer for 1983′s The Big Chill.  It was updated in 1998,the film’s 15th anniversary year, as part promo for the release of the remastered DVD edition.  The trailer offers a good, quick overview of the story and its characters, plus a sampling of the excellent 1960s music used throughout the film.”

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Monday’s Link Roundup.

**LAST WEEK to vote on my poll: How long have you been a personal historian? Click here to vote.**

Happy Memorial Day to all my American readers! This Monday’s Link Roundup has something for grammarians. Afraid of splitting your infinitives? Well, no need to worry! Check out Five Grammar “Rules” That Beg To Be Broken. If you find proofing your own work still leaves you missing pesky typos, then you’ll want to read Proofreading Tips for Finding Errors in Your Own Writing.

  • Five Grammar “Rules” That Beg To Be Broken. “For those of us who were actually taught grammar in school, we have stored in our long-term memory a list of unbreakable grammar rules…And guess what: some of the nevers never were grammar rules. They are grammar myths passed down from English teacher to English teacher to your boss.”
  • Preserving Family Memories (Podcast). “Stories. Conversations. Oral History Interviews. Whatever you call them, they can help us discover our family heritage and provide us with precious information that can be passed on for generations to come. We are preserving our family memories with Diane Haddad, the editor of Family Tree Magazine.”
  • ReclaimPrivacy Bookmarklet Rates Your Facebook Exposure Levels. “Facebook’s privacy settings are notoriously complex, and the results of changes hard to see instantly. ReclaimPrivacy.org has a handy bookmarklet that shows which potentially insecure and privacy-invading settings are enabled on your Facebook account when you click it.”
  • Proofreading Tips for Finding Errors in Your Own Writing. “Reading the newspaper each day, I catch frequent errors in grammar and usage. It’s easy for me to find errors in newspapers—and, in general, in the writing of others. What’s hard is finding errors in my own writing.”
  • The No. 1 Habit of Highly Creative People. “Creativity is a nebulous, murky topic that fascinates me endlessly — how does it work? What habits to creative people do that makes them so successful at creativity?”

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